US Treasuries – Expanding the confidence time horizon

In our previous analysis piece on the Erosion of Confidence in the Capital Market, we discussed the downward trend in US T-Bill since 2006. In today’s brief analysis piece we have expanded the time horizon to the last 10 years from the beginning of 2001 to the end of the second quarter in 2011 (being June 2011). The view is each quarter end point for both 1 and 10 Year US T-Bills for this 10 year period.

 

What is interesting about both the 1month, 1 Year & 10 Year charts is the steady rise in rates (and economic confidence since the Iraq war in 2003 for both 1month and 1Year T-Bills). The Iraq war was declared on 19 March 2003 and this is the low point of the yield curves, followed by a steady rise in yield rates to their highest point (1 Year T-Bills) on 27 June and 18 July 2006 at 5.28% respectively.

The other point to note is the steady state of the 10 Year T-Bills between 2001 to 2006 bouncing around between 4% and 5% and then the steady erosion in returns since Q3 2006. As of 19 August 2011, 10Year T-Bills yielded a nominal 2.07% or a real (inflation adjusted) return of 0.02%.

The flight to more traditional bullion assets or other currency classes has been marked, with currencies such as the Swiss Franc, Canadian Dollar, Sterling Pound & Australian Dollar appreciating in value relative to the US Dollar as the flight to perceived safer haven assets classes and categories continue.

Our sister site (theVirtuousContinuum, launching on 26 August 2011) will have a more detailed briefing and analysis regarding the lack of Global coordinated Financial and Economic Leadership in order to stem the tide of confidence ebbing away in the global capital, commodities and wealth markets.

 theMarketSoul ©2011

Source Material:

US Treasury web site at: http://www.treasury.gov

The source input data is available by clicking on this link

One thought on “US Treasuries – Expanding the confidence time horizon

  1. According to Zero Hedge, countries outside of the U.S. dumped 74 billion dollars in U.S. Treasuries, most of it over the weekend:

    “Over the weekend, we observed the perplexing sell off of $56 billion in US Treasurys courtesy of weekly disclosure in the Fed’s custodial account (source: H.4.1) and speculated if this may be due to an asset rotation, under duress or otherwise, out of bonds and into stocks, to prevent the collapse of the global ponzi (because when the BRICs tell the IMF to boost its bailout capacity you know it is global). We also proposed a far simpler theory: “the dreaded D-day in which foreign official and private investors finally start offloading their $2.7 trillion in Treasurys with impunity (although not with the element of surprise – China has made it abundantly clear it will sell its Treasury holdings, the only question is when), has finally arrived.” In hindsight the Occam’s Razor should have been applied. Little did we know 5 short days ago just how violent the reaction by China would be (both post and pre-facto) to the Senate decision to propose a law for all out trade warfare with China. Now we know – in the week ended October 12, a further $17.7 billion was “removed” from the Fed’s custodial Treasury account, meaning that someone, somewhere is very displeased with US paper, and, far more importantly, what it represents, and wants to make their displeasure heard loud and clear. (Source)

    Undoubtedly, the Chinese and other countries have recently discovered that Italy and Greece, with smaller debt to income ratios than the United States, are less riskier and carry a higher rate of return. This is because, unlike the US, the Rothschild/Rockefeller bond rating agencies have trashed their country’s debt ratings, forcing them to pay a much higher interest rate than U.S. Treasuries. Hey, if you take the risk, you might as well earn the reward!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s